Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13516
Title: Time resolved neutron diffraction studies of triglycine sulphate near the ferroelectric transition during the application of high voltage electric fields
Authors: Daniels, JE
Finlayson, TR
Studer, AJ
Hagen, ME
Keywords: Coherent scattering
Dielectric materials
Diffraction
Functions
Materials
Measuring instruments
Monitors
Oxygen compounds
Physical properties
Sulfur compounds
Issue Date: 27-Nov-2005
Publisher: The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
Citation: Daniels, J. E., Finlayson, T. R., Studer, A. J., & Hagen, M. E. (2005). Time resolved neutron diffraction studies of triglycine sulphate near the ferroelectric transition during the application of high voltage electric fields. Paper presented at the Eighth International Conference on Neutron Scattering ICNS 2005: "Neutrons for structure and dynamics - a new era", Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Sydney, Australia, 27 November-2 December 2005. 27 November-2 December 2005. In Final Programme and Abstract Book (p. 45).
Abstract: A new capability has been added to The Australian Stress Scanner (TASS), to allow the real-time response of neutron Bragg reflections to be monitored during the application of High Voltage fields. These experiments are performed using a stroboscopic technique which allows for timing resolutions below 30mus. Initial experiments using the new instrument have focussed on applying fields of up to 5kV/cm to samples of the ferroelectric triglycine sulphate (TGS), held at temperatures close to its ferroelectric/paraelectric transition temperature. The real-time responses of (0k0) type Bragg reflections in TGS show some unusual properties. In particular the (060) reflection shows several responses to the application of the field, including long relaxations over several seconds, as well as short spikes in intensity at field on and field off conditions which decay over approximately 150mus. This paper will present some of the recent data along with a discussion of the physical mechanisms leading to the intensity changes in Bragg reflections. © 2005 The Authors
Description: Physical copy held by ANSTO Library at DDC 539.7217/2
URI: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13516
Appears in Collections:Conference Publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.