ANSTO Publications Online

Welcome to the ANSTO Institutional Repository known as APO.

The APO database has been migrated to version 7.5. The functionality has changed, but the content remains the same.

ANSTO Publications Online is a digital repository for publications authored by ANSTO staff since 2007. The Repository also contains ANSTO Publications, such as Reports and Promotional Material. ANSTO publications prior to 2007 continue to be added progressively as they are in identified in the library. ANSTO authors can be identified under a single point of entry within the database. The citation is as it appears on the item, even with incorrect spelling, which is marked by (sic) or with additional notes in the description field.

If items are only held in hardcopy in the ANSTO Library collection notes are being added to the item to identify the Dewey Call number: as DDC followed by the number.

APO will be integrated with the Research Information System which is currently being implemented at ANSTO. The flow on effect will be permission to publish, which should allow pre-prints and post prints to be added where content is locked behind a paywall. To determine which version can be added to APO authors should check Sherpa Romeo. ANSTO research is increasingly being published in open access due mainly to the Council of Australian University Librarians read and publish agreements, and some direct publisher agreements with our organisation. In addition, open access items are also facilitated through collaboration and open access agreements with overseas authors such as Plan S.

ANSTO authors are encouraged to use a CC-BY licence when publishing open access. Statistics have been returned to the database and are now visible to users to show item usage and where this usage is coming from.

 

Communities in ANSTO Publications Online

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 5

Recent Submissions

Item
Corrigendum to “Application of chelating weak base resin Dowex M4195 to the recovery of uranium from mixed sulfate/chloride media” [Chem. Eng. J., 317 (2017) 80–89]
(Elsevier, 2017-09-15) Ogden, MD; Moon, EM; Wilson. A; Griffith, CS; Mata, JP; Soldenhoff, KH; Pepper, SE
The authors regret that the historical contributions from collaborators at ANSTO were not sufficiently acknowledged in this paper. The authors would like to add the following contributors, with the affiliations shown above. The acknowledgements should also state the following; “The authors would like to acknowledge the members of the Separations and Nuclear Chemical Engineering Research (SNUCER) group at the University of Sheffield who all assisted with this work in some capacity. Thank you to Prof. Neil Hyatt and Dr. Claire Corkhill in MIDAS, University of Sheffield for use of analytical equipment. Thank you to Dr. Gabriella Kakonyi at the Kroto Research Institute at the University of Sheffield for ICP-MS analysis. Funding was provided by the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at The University of Sheffield, as part of their start-up scheme. This work is published with the permission of the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, where most of the work was conducted.” The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused. © 2017 Elsevier B.V
Item
Computational fluid dynamics: a practical approach
(Elsevier, 2018-01-26) Tu, JY; Yeoh, GH; Liu, GQ
Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Practical Approach, Third Edition, is an introduction to CFD fundamentals and commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. The book is designed for a wide variety of engineering students new to CFD, and for practicing engineers learning CFD for the first time. Combining an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, this book walks the reader through modeling and computing, as well as interpreting CFD results. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new content and improved figures, examples and problems. © 2018 Elsevier
Item
Computational fluid dynamics: a practical approach
(2023-05-09) Tu, JY; Yeoh, GH; Liu CQ; Tao, Y
Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Practical Approach, Fourth Edition is an introduction to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) fundamentals and commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. The book is designed for a wide variety of engineering students new to CFD, but is also ideal for practicing engineers learning CFD for the first time. Combining an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, this book walks the reader through modeling and computing, as well as interpreting CFD results. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new content and improved figures, examples and problems. © 2023 Elsevier
Item
Computational fluid dynamics: a practical approach
(Elsevier, 2012-09-27) Tu, JY; Yeoh, GH; Liu, CQ
Computational Fluid Dynamics, Second Edition, provides an introduction to CFD fundamentals that focuses on the use of commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. This new edition provides expanded coverage of CFD techniques including discretisation via finite element and spectral element as well as finite difference and finite volume methods and multigrid method. There is additional coverage of high-pressure fluid dynamics and meshless approach to provide a broader overview of the application areas where CFD can be used. The book combines an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, walking students through modeling and computing as well as interpretation of CFD results. © 2012 Elsevier .
Item
Defect control and ionic conductivity of oxynitride perovskite Sr0.83Li0.17Ta0.83O1.88N0.74
(Elsevier, 2022-01) Kim, YI; Avdeev, M
Perovskite lattice was tailored by introducing site vacancies and mixed anion composition, to produce Sr0.83Li0.17Ta0.83O1.88N0.74 (Li02N). Further, Li02N was converted to a defect oxide Sr0.83Li0.17Ta0.83O3 (Li02O) by applying an optimized treatment: heating in air at 1173 K for 2 h. According to the neutron Rietveld refinement, Li02N and Li02O are tetragonal and orthorhombic, respectively, where the lattice volume of Li02O is significantly smaller than that of Li02N. The ionic conductivity (σion) of Li02N and Li02O was evaluated by the ac impedance spectroscopy and the equivalent circuit analysis. Both Li02N (σion = 10−5.5 S/cm at 671 K) and Li02O (σion = 10−6.2 S/cm at 667 K) exhibited an Arrhenius behavior of ionic conductivity with activation energies of 0.87 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively. It is interpreted that the nitride component enhances the ionic conduction of Li02N, while the vacancy of the anion lattice makes an opposite effect. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l.