Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13175
Title: Intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the piezoelectric effect in soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics by time-resolved neutron diffraction
Authors: Jones, JL
Daniels, JE
Studer, AJ
Hoffman, M
Finlayson, TR
Keywords: Piezoelectricity
PZT
Lead compounds
Titanates
Ceramics
ANSTO
Measuring instruments
Neutron diffraction
Crystal structure
Yields
Issue Date: 27-Nov-2005
Publisher: The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
Citation: Jones, J. L., Daniels, J. E., Studer, A. J., Hoffman, M., & Finlayson. T. R. (2005). Intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the piezoelectric effect in soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics by time-resolved neutron diffraction. Paper presented at the Eighth International Conference on Neutron Scattering ICNS2005, 27 November-2 December 2005, Final Programme and Abstract Book, "Neutrons for structure and dynamics - a new era", Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Sydney, Australia, 27 November-2 December 2005. (pp. 193).
Abstract: Piezoelectric ceramics are used in biomedical, naval, micromechanical, and many other precision engineering applications and therefore require a well-characterized, stable response. Utilizing a new capability developed on the The Australian Strain Scanner (TASS) at ANSTO, we have directly measured in situ the intrinsic and extrinsic t contributions to the piezoelectric effect in soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. The 002 and 200 diffraction peaks are measured as a function of time using a stroboscopic technique which enables timing resolutions of less than 30us. In other words, we have measured the 200 and 002 peak profiles as a function of time during piezoelectric activation. In this tetragonal crystal structure, a comparison of the 002 and 200 integrated intensity yields the non-180° domain switching contribution (extrinsic) while shifting of the peaks yields the change in 001 and 100 lattice strains (intrinsic). Both components lead to the macroscopic strain measured as the piezoelectric response, which is found to be a function of frequency and applied electric field. These results go toward explaining the nonlinearities of piezoelectric response versus frequency and magnitude of driving field measured in earlier work. © The Authors
Description: Physical copy held by ANSTO Library at DDC 539.7217/2
URI: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13175
Appears in Collections:Conference Publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.