Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/10480
Title: Characterization of the subsurface architecture and identification of potential groundwater paths in a clay-rich floodplain using multi-electrode resistivity imaging
Authors: Guinea, A
Hollins, SE
Meredith, KT
Hankin, SI
Cendón, DI
Keywords: Tomography
Groundwater recharge
Marshes
Surface waters
Ground water
Artesian basins
New South Wales
Australia
Issue Date: 18-Apr-2018
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Citation: Guinea, A., Hollins, S., Meredith, K., Hankin, S., & Cendón, D. I. (2018). Characterization of the subsurface architecture and identification of potential groundwater paths in a clay-rich floodplain using multi-electrode resistivity imaging. Hydrological Sciences Journal, 63(6), 909-925. doi:10.1080/02626667.2018.1459624
Abstract: The interaction between surface water and groundwater in clay-rich fluvial environments can be complex and is generally poorly understood. Airborne electromagnetic surveys are often used for characterizing regional groundwater systems, but they are constrained by the resolution of the method. A resistivity imaging survey has been carried out in the Macquarie Marshes (New South Wales, Australia) in combination with water chemical sampling. The results have enabled the identification of buried palaeochannels and the location of potential recharge points. The data have been compared with previously published airborne electromagnetic data in the same area. Deeper less conductive features suggest that there is a potential connection between the Great Artesian Basin and groundwater contained within the shallow sand aquifer. Even though the chemistry of the groundwater samples does not indicate interaction with the Great Artesian Basin, the observed discontinuity in the saprolite implies potential for this to happen in other locations. The interaction between surface water and groundwater in clay-rich fluvial environments can be complex and is generally poorly understood. Airborne electromagnetic surveys are often used for characterizing regional groundwater systems, but they are constrained by the resolution of the method. A resistivity imaging survey has been carried out in the Macquarie Marshes (New South Wales, Australia) in combination with water chemical sampling. The results have enabled the identification of buried palaeochannels and the location of potential recharge points. The data have been compared with previously published airborne electromagnetic data in the same area. Deeper less conductive features suggest that there is a potential connection between the Great Artesian Basin and groundwater contained within the shallow sand aquifer. Even though the chemistry of the groundwater samples does not indicate interaction with the Great Artesian Basin, the observed discontinuity in the saprolite implies potential for this to happen in other locations. © 2018 International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS)
URI: https://doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2018.1459624
https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/10480
ISSN: 2150-3435
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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