Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/6097
Title: Understanding the effect of nanoporosity on optimizing the performance of self-healing materials for anti-corrosion applications
Authors: Sellaiyan, S
Smith, SV
Hughes, AE
Miller, A
Jenkins, DR
Uedono, A
Keywords: Spectroscopy
Polymers
Microscopy
Chromates
Glass
Metals
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Publisher: IOP Publishing
Citation: Sellaiyan, S., Smith, S. V , Hughes, A. E., Miller, A., Jenkins, D. R., & Uedono, A. Understanding the effect of nanoporosity on optimizing the performance of self-healing materials for anti-corrosion applications. (2011). Understanding the effect of nanoporosity on optimizing the performance of self-healing materials for anti-corrosion applications S Sellaiyan1,2, S V Smith1, A E Hughes3, A Miller4, D R Jenkins5 and A Uedono6Centres for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS) at the 1Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the 2Australian National University.3CSIRO Future Manufacturing Flagship, Clayton South MDC 3169. 4CSIRO Mathematical and Information Sciences, Glen Osmond, SA 5064. 5CSIRO Mathematical and Information Sciences, North Ryde NSW 1670. 6Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573, Japan E-mail: svs@ansto.gov.au Abstract. The chromate-based epoxy primer film was prepared on glass and metal surfaces using various graded doctor blades. The quality and consistency of the films was assessed using scanning electron microscopy and the porosity within the film characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The positron lifetime (τ) distribution for the epoxy polymer matrix was resolved using the CONTIN program. The free volume was found from the ortho-positronium component. The optimum thickness for the films was established for future structure/activity studies. 1. Introduction Materials that have the ability to heal themselves are known as self-healing. They have the ability to restore the material to its original set of properties after thermal or mechanical damage. They can be metals, ceramics, polymers or their composites. One well known class of inhibited paints is the chromate based primers, which are still used in the most severe environments to protect a wide range of metallic substrates [1,2]. These types of coating systems are currently employed to protect a wide range of engineered structures from corrosion [3]. In the aerospace industry, alloys are selected for their superior ratio of weight to mechanical performance. However, they have poor corrosion resistance and films must be developed to protect them. These protective films are generally paint based incorporating chemical inhibitors that have the ability to prevent or slow corrosive processes. The inhibitor contains a leachable component (anti-corrosive pigment) that is released in order to prevent the corrosive reactions. The free volumes or voids are important properties to incorporate into the films for the inhibitor to work efficiently. We are interested to understand how porosity influences the ability of these films to repair themselves. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) technique is a powerful characterization tool for the study of free volume sizes and free volume fraction in polymeric materials. The utility of the 1 Correspondence to S. V. Smith, Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232, Australia. 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12). In Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 262, 12054. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/262/1/012054
Abstract: The chromate-based epoxy primer film was prepared on glass and metal surfaces using various graded doctor blades. The quality and consistency of the films was assessed using scanning electron microscopy and the porosity within the film characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The positron lifetime (τ) distribution for the epoxy polymer matrix was resolved using the CONTIN program. The free volume was found from the ortho-positronium component. The optimum thickness for the films was established for future structure/activity studies. © 2014 IOP Publishing LTD
Gov't Doc #: 5297
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/262/1/012054
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/6097
ISSN: 1742-6588
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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