ANSTO Publications Online

Welcome to the ANSTO Institutional Repository known as APO.

The APO database has been migrated to version 7.5. The functionality has changed, but the content remains the same.

ANSTO Publications Online is a digital repository for publications authored by ANSTO staff since 2007. The Repository also contains ANSTO Publications, such as Reports and Promotional Material. ANSTO publications prior to 2007 continue to be added progressively as they are in identified in the library. ANSTO authors can be identified under a single point of entry within the database. The citation is as it appears on the item, even with incorrect spelling, which is marked by (sic) or with additional notes in the description field.

If items are only held in hardcopy in the ANSTO Library collection notes are being added to the item to identify the Dewey Call number: as DDC followed by the number.

APO will be integrated with the Research Information System which is currently being implemented at ANSTO. The flow on effect will be permission to publish, which should allow pre-prints and post prints to be added where content is locked behind a paywall. To determine which version can be added to APO authors should check Sherpa Romeo. ANSTO research is increasingly being published in open access due mainly to the Council of Australian University Librarians read and publish agreements, and some direct publisher agreements with our organisation. In addition, open access items are also facilitated through collaboration and open access agreements with overseas authors such as Plan S.

ANSTO authors are encouraged to use a CC-BY licence when publishing open access. Statistics have been returned to the database and are now visible to users to show item usage and where this usage is coming from.

 

Communities in ANSTO Publications Online

Select a community to browse its collections.

Now showing 1 - 5 of 5

Recent Submissions

Item
Development of a modular ceramic knee prosthesis
(Humana Press, 2000) Payten, WM; Ben-Nissan, B
Degenerative joint disease, recognized as an increasing problem for society, is a direct result of an aging population (1). When patients present with joint pain, their primary concern is the relief of pain and return to a mobile life style. This often requires replacement of skeletal parts, such as hips, knees, elbows, finger joints, shoulder, and teeth, or fusion of vertebrae, and repair or augmentation of the jaw and bones of the skull. The result is a current worldwide orthopedic market valued at over $5 billion; joint replacement represents 68% of this market. The demand for knee replacements is increasing at approx 17%/yr, with some 300,000 knee joints replaced each year in the United States alone (2). This increase results in part from increased confidence in using such prostheses. Unfortunately, results do not reinforce this confidence: Long-term clinical results are scattered (3), and, although the overall rate of failure is reasonably low, it remains unacceptable. A further complication arises because the increase in younger patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may well lead to a higher incidence of eventual failure. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000
Item
Design of H-knee: a modular ceramic total knee replacement prosthesis
(Australasian Ceramic Society, 1988-09) Payten, WM; Ben-Nissan, B
Degenerative joint disease, recognized as an increasing problem for society, is a direct result of an aging population. When patients present with joint pain, their primary concern is the relief of pain and return to a mobile life style. This often requires replacement of skeletal parts, such as hips, knees, elbows, finger joints, shoulder, and teeth, or fusion of vertebrae, and repair or augmentation of the jaw and bones of the skull. The result is a current worldwide orthopedic market valued at over $5 billion; joint replacement represents 68% of this market. The demand for knee replacements is increasing at approximately 17%/ p.a., with some 300,000 knee joints replaced each year in the United States alone. This increase results in part from increased confidence in using such prostheses. Unfortunately, results do not reinforce this confidence: Long-term clinical results are scattered, and, although the overall rate of failure is reasonably low, it remains unacceptable. A further complication arises because the increase in younger patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may well lead to a higher incidence of eventual failure.
Item
Trials and tribulations of communicating ionising radiation to the public - 30 years of reflection
(Australiasian Radiation Protection Society, 2012-10-16) McCarthy, L
Thirty years working in the field of nuclear medicine, confronted with attitudes and beliefs of both fact and fiction regarding risks posed with radiation has been an interesting challenge. Communicating radiation risks, alleviating fear and the benefits of the field of nuclear medicine requires it to be related to a wide variety of public groups or persons for many different reasons, for example; Why nuclear medicine is a worthwhile procedure and we need a reactor in Australia Why do I need to be injected with a radioactive substance and how is that safe Apprehensive nursing staff having to care for a person treated with high doses of radioactive Iodine Why choose a career in Nuclear Medicine Anti-nuclear activists Why can't I just say 1m injecting a dye, like they do in radiography Healthcare 8 radiation protection professionals, and members of the public have the opportunity to break down the barriers and bridge the gap associated with the common misconceptions and fears related to the radiation involved in nuclear medicine, if the information is relayed with simple clarity and honesty. The presentation reviews the trials and tribulations of working with industry and community groups to break down these misconceptions and gain public support in various facets —such as a career, undertaking a diagnostic procedure, caring for a patient and support for a nuclear reactor. The presentation will review the success and pitfalls of pamphlets, videos, forums, training materials, various media and modalities utilised to communicate radiation risks to various groups and or persons.
Item
Emergence of competency based training in radiation safety and developing training courses incorporating these units, oh! what a task!
(Australiasian Radiation Protection Society, 2012-10-16) McCarthy, L
In recent times Government Skills Australia developed ten competency based training units in radiation safety, which are part of the Public Sector training package. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation will be implementing these units into the various commercial training programs it has been conducting for the past 1 5 years. Competency based training has long been a part of Vocational Educational Training (VET)and for those who wish to embark on the development of courses based on the radiation safety competency units a steep learning curve is required, involving new terminology, ever changing departments, websites, regulations and guidelines. (an example of this is the NSW Environmental Protection Agency and its many name changes over the past few years). The presentation will describe the steps and pitfalls encountered by ANSTO since embarking on the remake of our radiation safety training courses incorporating the competency based radiation safety units in Public Sector training package PSP04. The presentation will provide an introduction to these units, including recent changes of Certificate IV in Training and Assessment. CertlV in Training and Assessment is a recommended qualification to begin the challenge of working within the VET system. It is essential due to the recent version changes to upgrade the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment TAA40104 qualification to the TAE401 10 qualification. For those interested parties I will provide a "hands on" navigation of VET system websites and overview of the radiation safety competency units.
Item
Options for an Australian hadron therapy facility
(Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, 2012-04-20) Boldeman, JW
It is believed that a compelling case can be made for the construction of a very high Hadron Research Facility in Australia. Several proposals have been prepared in the past. In all cases, the accelerator on which the facility was based would have had the capability of producing highly precise and controlled proton beams with variable energies between 60 and 250 MeV. One of the previous proposals also suggested a more advanced accelerator system capable of producing, in addition, carbon beams with energies variable from 120 - 430 MeV/amu. This paper considers some options for a possible Australian Facility.