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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/2436

Title: Liquid crystalline systems of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate containing a hydrophilic protein: characterisation, swelling and release kinetics.
Authors: Rizwan, SB
Hanley, T
Boyd, BJ
Rades, T
Hook, S
Keywords: Diffusion
Proteins
Lipids
Kinetics
Small Angle Scattering
Swelling
Issue Date: Nov-2009
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Rizwan, S. B., Hanley, T., Boyd, B. J., Rades, T., & Hook, S. (2009). Liquid crystalline systems of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate containing a hydrophilic protein: characterisation, swelling and release kinetics. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 98(11), 4191-4204.
Abstract: Swelling and phase behaviour of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) matrices with varying water loadings were investigated. Release of a model protein, FITC-Ova was subsequently examined. Polarised light microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering analysis showed that the addition of FITC-Ova only altered the liquid crystalline structure of phytantriol matrices at low water loadings, and that postrelease study, the phase structure of matrices at both low and high loading reflected that of the binary system. Addition of FITC-Ova to GMO matrices also altered the liquid crystalline structure when compared to the respective binary system at low but not at high loading. All samples analysed after the release study had transformed to the reverse hexagonal phase (H-II). Swelling studies revealed a faster and more extensive swelling of GMO when compared to phytantriol. Release of FITC-Ova from phytantriol matrices was faster and occurred to a greater extent most likely due to the conversion of GMO matrices into the H-II phase. No effect on release as a function of initial water content was observed for either lipid. We have confirmed that phytantriol based liquid crystalline matrices can sustain the release of a hydrophilic protein, suggesting its suitability as a potential sustained antigen-delivery system. © 2009, Wiley-Blackwell. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.21724
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/2436
ISSN: 0022-3549
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