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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/1006

Title: Influence of storage conditions on the structure, thermal behavior, and formation of enzyme-resistant starch in extruded starches.
Authors: Chanvrier, H
Uthayakumaran, S
Appelqvist, IAM
Gidley, MJ
Gilbert, EP
Lopez-Rubio, A
Keywords: Starch
Enzymes
Extrusion
X-Ray Diffraction
Food
Small Angle Scattering
Issue Date: 26-Oct-2007
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Citation: Chanvrier, H., Uthayakumaran, S., Appelqvist, I. A. M., Gidley, M. J., Gilbert, E. P., & Lopez-Rubio, A. (2007). Influence of storage conditions on the structure, thermal behavior, and formation of enzyme-resistant starch in extruded starches. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 55(24), 9883-9890.
Abstract: Starch structures from an extrusion process were stored at different temperatures to allow for molecular rearrangement (retrogradation); their thermal characteristics (DSC) and resistance to amylase digestion were measured and compared. The structure of four native and processed starches containing different amylose/amylopectin compositions (3.5, 30.8, 32, and 80% amylose content, respectively) before and after digestion was studied with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Rearrangement of the amylose molecules was observed for each storage condition as measured by the DSC endotherm at around 145°C. The crystalline organization of the starches after processing and storage was qualitatively different to that of the native starches. However, there was no direct correlation between the initial crystallinity and the amount of enzyme-resistant starch (ERS) measured after in vitro digestion, and only in the case of high-amylose starch did the postprocess conditioning used lead to a small increase in the amount of starch remaining after the enzymatic treatment. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that retrograded amylose is not directly correlated with ERS and alternative mechanisms must be responsible for ERS formation. © 2007, American Chemical Society
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021%2Fjf071974e
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/1006
ISSN: 0021-8561
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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