Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/9287
Title: Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae
Authors: Raoult, VV
Peddemors, VM
Zahra, D
Howell, NR
Howard, DL
de Jonge, MD
Williamson, JE
Keywords: Strontium
Mineralization
Vertebrates
Fishes
Microscopy
Salinity
Issue Date: 18-Jul-2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Raoult, V., Peddemors, V. M., Zahra, D., Howell, N., Howard, D. L., de Jonge, M. D., & Williamson, J. E. (2016). Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae. Scientific Reports, 6(1), 29698. doi:10.1038/srep29698
Abstract: Determining the age of sharks using vertebral banding is a vital component of management, but the causes of banding are not fully understood. Traditional shark ageing is based on fish otolith ageing methods where growth bands are assumed to result from varied seasonal calcification rates. Here we investigate these assumptions by mapping elemental distribution within the growth bands of vertebrae from six species of sharks representing four different taxonomic orders using scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Traditional visual growth bands, determined with light microscopy, were more closely correlated to strontium than calcium in all species tested. Elemental distributions suggest that vertebral strontium bands may be related to environmental variations in salinity. These results highlight the requirement for a better understanding of shark movements, and their influence on vertebral development, if confidence in age estimates is to be improved. Analysis of shark vertebrae using similar strontium-focused elemental techniques, once validated for a given species, may allow more successful estimations of age on individuals with few or no visible vertebral bands. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited
Gov't Doc #: 8868
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep29698
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/9287
ISSN: 2045-2322
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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