Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/9185
Title: Simultaneous scanning of two mice in a small-animal PET scanner: a simulation-based assessment of the signal degradation
Authors: Reilhac, A
Boisson, F
Wimberley, C
Parmar, A
Zahra, D
Hamze, H
Davis, E
Arthur, A
Bouillot, C
Charil, A
Gregoire, MC
Keywords: Positron computed tomography
Animals
Mice
Monte Carlo Method
Body
Brain
Phantoms
Organs
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2016
Publisher: IOP science publishing
Citation: Reilhac, A., Boisson, F., Wimberley, C., Parmar, A., Zahra, D., Hamze, H., Davis, E., Arthur, A., Bouillot, C., Charil, A., & Gregoire, M. C. (2016). Simultaneous scanning of two mice in a small-animal PET scanner: a simulation-based assessment of the signal degradation. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 61(3), 1371-1388. doi:10.1088/0031-9155/61/3/1371
Abstract: In PET imaging, research groups have recently proposed different experimental set ups allowing multiple animals to be simultaneously imaged in a scanner in order to reduce the costs and increase the throughput. In those studies, the technical feasibility was demonstrated and the signal degradation caused by additional mice in the FOV characterized, however, the impact of the signal degradation on the outcome of a PET study has not yet been studied. Here we thoroughly investigated, using Monte Carlo simulated [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride PET studies, different experimental designs for whole-body and brain acquisitions of two mice and assessed the actual impact on the detection of biological variations as compared to a single-mouse setting. First, we extended the validation of the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulation platform for the simultaneous simulation of two animals. Then, we designed [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride input mouse models for the simulation of realistic whole-body and brain PET studies. Simulated studies allowed us to accurately estimate the differences in detection between single- and dual-mode acquisition settings that are purely the result of having two animals in the FOV. Validation results showed that PET-SORTEO accurately reproduced the spatial resolution and noise degradations that were observed with actual dual phantom experiments. The simulated [18F]FDG whole-body study showed that the resolution loss due to the off-center positioning of the mice was the biggest contributing factor in signal degradation at the pixel level and a minimal inter-animal distance as well as the use of reconstruction methods with resolution modeling should be preferred. Dual mode acquisition did not have a major impact on ROI-based analysis except in situations where uptake values in organs from the same subject were compared. The simulated [11C]Raclopride study however showed that dual-mice imaging strongly reduced the sensitivity to variations when mice were positioned side-by-side while no sensitivity reduction was observed when they were facing each other. This is the first study showing the impact of different experimental designs for whole-body and brain acquisitions of two mice on the quality of the results using Monte Carlo simulated [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride PET studies. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine
Gov't Doc #: 8869
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/61/3/1371
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/9185
ISSN: 0031-9155
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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