Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/6493
Title: Modern depositional processes in a confined bedrock setting: benches of the Shoalhaven river
Authors: Kermode, SJ
Cohen, TC
Reinfelds, IV
Nanson, GC
Jones, BJ
Keywords: Meetings
Australia
New South Wales
Deposition
Rivers
Floods
Alluvial deposits
Issue Date: 27-Aug-2013
Publisher: International Association of Geomorphologists
Citation: Kermode, S. J., Cohen, T. C., Reinfelds, I. V., Nanson, G. C., & Jones, B. G. (2013). Modern depositional processes in a confined bedrock setting: Benches of the Shoalhaven River. Paper presented at the 8th International conference (AIG) on Geomorphology, Paris - 2013, 27-31 August.
Abstract: The lower Shoalhaven River provides an opportunity to examine bench processes in a confined setting. Stratigraphic analysis of trenches and augur holes, ground penetrating radar, Hec-RAS modelling and geochronological techniques combine to identify that benches of multiple levels along Bull Reach are composed of coarse material and have been extensively eroded and reworked by modern events. Kermode et al. (2012) established the long-term polycyclical nature of the higher alluvial surfaces (up to 193 ka in age), and this is contrasted with the youth of the lower inset alluvial surfaces, which are shown to be less than 270 years in age. This study evaluates the relative significance of both flood regime and effects of European settlement on the geomorphic effectiveness of high magnitude events and investigates the characteristics of bench formation in this confined setting. It characterises the nature of depositional events and the relationship between facies at an event scale. Using Hec-RAS modelling, events of different recurrence intervals are compared to explore the relative impact of varying flood magnitudes. The results bring into question the theory that inundation frequencies of these surfaces are constant, or associated with formative processes. © Authors
The lower Shoalhaven River provides an opportunity to examine bench processes in a confined setting. Stratigraphic analysis of trenches and augur holes, ground penetrating radar, Hec-RAS modelling and geochronological techniques combine to identify that benches of multiple levels along Bull Reach are composed of coarse material and have been extensively eroded and reworked by modern events. Kermode et al. (2012) established the long-term polycyclical nature of the higher alluvial surfaces (up to 193 ka in age), and this is contrasted with the youth of the lower inset alluvial surfaces, which are shown to be less than 270 years in age. This study evaluates the relative significance of both flood regime and effects of European settlement on the geomorphic effectiveness of high magnitude events and investigates the characteristics of bench formation in this confined setting. It characterises the nature of depositional events and the relationship between facies at an event scale. Using Hec-RAS modelling, events of different recurrence intervals are compared to explore the relative impact of varying flood magnitudes. The results bring into question the theory that inundation frequencies of these surfaces are constant, or associated with formative processes.
Gov't Doc #: 6323
URI: http://irangeomorphology.ir/files/site1/pages/Conference%20poster/abstracts_book_iag_paris_2013-1_part1.pdf
http://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/6493
Appears in Collections:Conference Publications

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ABSTRACTS_BOOK_IAG_PARIS_2013.pdf6.52 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.